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sift cruft

Sift Cruft (after snowden)

This cruft images is created using a sequence of images captured from closed-circuit television (CCTV) cameras watching commuters cross the Brooklyn Bridge in New York City. The algorithm searches for an area of suspicion, which is then highlighted by a white circle. These images are collected morning and evening, at the times most suspicious activity occurs.

Report Suspicious Activity: Stay alert. Be aware. Speak up

At The Port Authority of New York & New Jersey, your safety is our top priority.

We've added new state-of-the-art camera and surveillance equipment and installed specialized detection and emergency notification systems. We have one of the largest law enforcement canine units in the U.S. We're continually gathering intelligence from multiple sources, and work closely with our regional transportation partners and law enforcement agencies at the local, state and federal levels.

Remember, if you see suspicious activity or packages while you're traveling through Port Authority facilities, pick up the phone and report it. It's our job to check it out and to keep you safe! Stay alert. Be aware. Speak up.

Report suspicious activity by calling the Port Authority Police at 800-828-PAPD (7273). You can download the 800# from your mobile device using the smartphone application available above.

— Report Suspicious Activity. (n.d.). In, The Port Authority of NY & NJ. Retrieved July 22, 2013, from http://www.panynj.gov/police/report-suspicious-activity.html

Further Resources


http://www.panynj.gov/police/report-suspicious-activity.html

CRUFT: Art from Digital Leftovers

I make work that spans computational art, performance, installation, painting and object-making, using collage, remix, automation, indeterminacy, and randomness to bear upon the computer and the Internet as machines that regulate and restrict just as much as they can be used to disrupt and resist dominant codes of seeing and being.

My art practice reflects on our relationship to media technologies, especially surveillance and mind control, and in the process contemplates what a post-human art may look like. Organized under the umbrella concept of Cruft, I take apart, juxtapose, recycle, and interrupt the relentless flow of media to reveal a relationship in which we don't simply consume media, but are also consumed by it.

Digital collages called Cruft are created by scraping the web using computational algorithms that remix mainstream media sites like CNN with social networks of individuals, and reproduce, in mimicry of the 24/7 media cycle, the narrow choices permitted in public discourse. In another series of recent work, Machine Vision, I recombine footage from surveillance cameras with other media, to explore the relationship between war, surveillance, and automation within an overall machine aesthetic.